Green number plates get the green light for a zero-emission future

£12 million investment also announced for ground-breaking zero-emission vehicle research

Case Studies

Biomethane injected into the Irish grid for the first time

Over 36,000 megawatt hours of biomethane is being supplied to the Irish gas network, produced by an anaerobic digester at a nearby pig farm

An East Anglian landowner adapts and prospers through renewables

The Raynham Estate in north Norfolk is steeped in history and since the 1500s has been a part of the Townshend family, which has...

Wiltshire dairy farm adds energy to milk production

Stowell Dairies required capital investment to improve the dairy unit at East Stowell and to meet amended slurry regulations. EnviTec Biogas UK worked with...

Poultry farmer turned to novel form of ventilation to keep chicks warm

When Nick Bragg set up his Somerset-based Nettlecombe chicken farm business, he was in the enviable position of being able to design the entire...

Green number plates are set to be rolled out from autumn, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps confirmed today, under plans to drive a green economic recovery.

As part of the government’s plans to achieve net zero emissions by 2050, drivers will be encouraged to make the switch to electric vehicles through the introduction of green number plates. The plates will make it easier for cars to be identified as zero-emission vehicles, helping local authorities design and put in place new policies to incentivise people to own and drive them.

For example, drivers could benefit from local initiatives such as cheaper parking and cost-free entry into zero-emission zones where those with a green number plate will be recognised as eligible.

The plates will be identifiable by a green flash on the left-hand side and will be available for zero-emission vehicles only.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said:

“A green recovery is key to helping us achieve our net zero carbon commitments while also promoting economic growth. 

“Green number plates could unlock a number of incentives for drivers and increase awareness of cleaner vehicles on our roads, showing people that a greener transport future is within our grasp.  

“We’re supporting small businesses to develop the transport tech of the future through a multi-million pound investment, ensuring that UK businesses remain at the forefront of low carbon innovation and research.’’

This follows the conclusion of a consultation, inviting comments from the public, local authorities and industry stakeholders from a range of sectors including motoring and consumer groups and vehicle manufacturers on how best to introduce green number plates.

To further accelerate the government’s plans to drive a green recovery, £12m funding for ground-breaking research into the zero-emission market has also been announced to develop greener vehicles and help improve vehicle charging technology.

The funding, made available through the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and delivered through Innovate UK, will see £10million for a new Zero-Emission Vehicle Innovation Competition. This will invite applicants to bid for project funding to support advancements in both battery electric and hydrogen vehicles, as well as charging infrastructure.

OLEV is also providing £2million to UK small and medium businesses to support their research into zero-emission vehicles in areas such as battery technology, which could be used by major vehicle manufacturers in future electric vehicle production.

The funding will help these businesses to drive local economic growth through research and development projects in areas including charging infrastructure and zero-emission vehicles, which could in turn strengthen UK industrial expertise and create jobs.

Related

Latest in Advice & Opportunities

National Grid scheme paying generators to switch off

The COVID-19 lockdown has recently seen demand for electricity drop by as much as 20%. This has led to the National Grid looking for...

Ferment organic matter to build soil health

Farmers who want to increase soil organic matter and health – while also reducing their CO2 footprint - should consider fermenting their manure rather...

Commercial and environmental benefits of Miscanthus outlined in new study

Miscanthus is recommended by the Committee on Climate Change as a crop which helps to offset CO2 emissions, but how practical is it on British farms? A new...

Managing climate change is the future, highlights CAAV

Mitigating and adapting to climate change is going to be the main driver for policy in the coming decades and farmers need to be...

Prime opportunity for energy schemes, says Roadnight Taylor

There has never been a better time for landowners to seek ground rent from energy schemes, with some worth up to £8m over their...